Proclaiming the Lordship and
Love of Jesus Christ!

Serving Charismatic Catholics in the counties of
San Francisco, San Mateo and Marin.


Mission Statement

As a lay organization, the mission of the Charismatic Renewal is:

  1. To help all people come to know the love of God in their lives as demonstrated through our Lord, Jesus Christ.
  2. To help our brothers and sisters respond to God's love by loving God in return through a commitment to serve Christ and His Church.
  3. To assist them to listen and follow the movement of the Holy Spirit at work in their lives.
  4. To help our brothers and sisters recognize the ministry that God has called them to, and accept the gifts that God desires to bestow upon them for His work in our Church and in our world.
  5. To lead them to a New Life offered to us by the Holy Spirit.

Click here for an Introduction
to the Archdiocese of San Francisco Charismatic Renewal

Click here for
"Preparing for the year of Jubilee: 50 Years of the Catholic Renewal"



CELEBRATION OF PALM SUNDAY OF THE PASSION OF THE LORD
HOMILY OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS

Saint Peter's Square
XXX World Youth Day
Sunday, 29 March 2015

At the heart of this celebration, which seems so festive, are the words we heard in the hymn of the Letter to the Philippians: "He humbled himself" (2:8). Jesus' humiliation.

These words show us God's way and, consequently, that which must be the way of Christians: it is humility. A way which constantly amazes and disturbs us: we will never get used to a humble God!

Humility is above all God's way: God humbles himself to walk with his people, to put up with their infidelity. This is clear when we read the the story of the Exodus. How humiliating for the Lord to hear all that grumbling, all those complaints against Moses, but ultimately against him, their Father, who brought them out of slavery and was leading them on the journey through the desert to the land of freedom.

This week, Holy Week, which leads us to Easter, we will take this path of Jesus' own humiliation. Only in this way will this week be "holy" for us too!

We will feel the contempt of the leaders of his people and their attempts to trip him up. We will be there at the betrayal of Judas, one of the Twelve, who will sell him for thirty pieces of silver. We will see the Lord arrested and carried off like a criminal; abandoned by his disciples, dragged before the Sanhedrin, condemned to death, beaten and insulted. We will hear Peter, the "rock" among the disciples, deny him three times. We will hear the shouts of the crowd, egged on by their leaders, who demand that Barabas be freed and Jesus crucified. We will see him mocked by the soldiers, robed in purple and crowned with thorns. And then, as he makes his sorrowful way beneath the cross, we will hear the jeering of the people and their leaders, who scoff at his being King and Son of God.

This is God's way, the way of humility. It is the way of Jesus; there is no other. And there can be no humility without humiliation.

Following this path to the full, the Son of God took on the "form of a slave" (cf. Phil 2:7). In the end, humility also means service. It means making room for God by stripping oneself, "emptying oneself", as Scripture says (v. 7). This – the pouring out of oneself – is the greatest humiliation of all.

There is another way, however, opposed to the way of Christ. It is worldliness, the way of the world. The world proposes the way of vanity, pride, success… the other way. The Evil One proposed this way to Jesus too, during his forty days in the desert. But Jesus immediately rejected it. With him, and only by his grace, with his help, we too can overcome this temptation to vanity, to worldliness, not only at significant moments, but in daily life as well.

In this, we are helped and comforted by the example of so many men and women who, in silence and hiddenness, sacrifice themselves daily to serve others: a sick relative, an elderly person living alone, a disabled person, the homeless...

We think too of the humiliation endured by all those who, for their lives of fidelity to the Gospel, encounter discrimination and pay a personal price. We think too of our brothers and sisters who are persecuted because they are Christians, the martyrs of our own time – and there are many. They refuse to deny Jesus and they endure insult and injury with dignity. They follow him on his way. In truth, we can speak of a "cloud of witnesses" – the martyrs of our own time (cf. Heb 12:1).

During this week, let us set about with determination along this same path of humility, with immense love for him, our Lord and Saviour. Love will guide us and give us strength. For where he is, we too shall be (cf. Jn 12:26).




Archbishop Cordileone is asking local Catholics to pray and sacrifice in 4 ways to protect freedom, marriage and life.

PRAYING TO CHANGE THE CULTURE

My Dear Sisters and Brothers in the Renewal,

I'd like to echo the invitation of Archbishop Cordileone and the rest of the Catholic Bishops of the United States to advance a movement for Life, Marriage and Religious Liberty through prayer, penance and sacrifice. Prayers and acts of penance and sacrifice have always been the source of strength for the heroes and champions of our faith. By their lives of prayer and penance, they were able to bring about transformation in the society and culture of their time. As we face similar challenges today, we are once again encouraged to pray for rebuilding a culture favorable to life, marriage and for increased protections of religious liberty. This call to prayer is prompted by the recent disregard of life through senseless killings and abortions, the HHS Mandate, which would require religious employers to provide employee benefits that are judged to be immoral, and a culture intent on redefining marriage. Our Bishops' invitation to prayer and sacrifice hopes to increase awareness of the Church's challenges and build spiritual stamina among us so that we can be effective and joyful witnesses of the New Evangelization during this Year of Faith and beyond.

Attached is the article, "Praying To Change The Culture", that appeared in Catholic San Francisco. I'd encourage you to read the beautiful write-up that outlines clearly what we should do during this Year of Faith. As members of the SF Renewal, let us support the call of our Bishops by inviting our own families, friends and prayer groups in joining our respective parishes and communities through the following:

Thank you and may the Holy Spirit continue to strengthen us in making our faith visible and relevant in the world we live in.

Fr. Ray – Rev. Raymund Reyes – Liaison,
San Francisco Archdiocese Catholic Charismatic Renewal




"You Will Receive Power"

"You will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes down on you; then you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, throughout Judea and Samaria, yes, even to the ends of the earth." (Acts 1:8)

"Today, millions of Catholics in more than 115 countries are involved in the Catholic Charismatic Renewal. What accounts for this dramatic growth? Those involved in the Renewal say that God has touched them in some profound way, releasing the power of the Holy Spirit in their lives.

The goal of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal is to serve the mission of the Church by enabling people to live a renewed and Christian life in the power of the Holy Spirit. Every Christian is called to be charismatic – that is, to be equipped with gifts of service for the good of the Church. (1Cor.12)

In the Catholic Charismatic Renewal, Catholics speak of being "baptized in the Holy Spirit." This statement does not change the Catholic teaching about the Sacrament of Baptism. It simply means that the power of the Spirit received in the Sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation often awaits a fuller "release" in the lives of many Christians."

Click here to view a video about the History of the Charismatic Renewal in the Catholic Church.


Catholic Bible Search

Other Bible Versions

Lookup a word or passage in the Bible



BibleGateway.com
Include this form on your page